Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December 9th, 2005

Christmas Party

FROM: Pauline Lewis, Human Resources Director

TO: All Employees

DATE: 4th November

RE: Christmas Party

I’m happy to inform you that the company Christmas Party will take place
on December 23rd, starting at noon in the private function room at the
Grill House.
There will be a cash bar and plenty of drinks! We’ll have a small band
playing traditional carols…please feel free to sing along.

And don’t be surprised if the Managing Director shows up dressed as
Santa Claus! A Christmas tree will be lit at 1.00p.m.

Exchange of gifts among employees can be done at that time; however,
no gift should be over $10.00 to make the giving of gifts easy for
everyone’s pockets.

This gathering is only for employees! The Managing Director will make a
special announcement at the Party. Merry Christmas to you and your
Family.

Pauline
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The Geneva Convention signatories have adopted the Red Crystal as a third symbol to join the Red Crescent and Red Cross, which, among other things, allows Israel’s version of the organization to affiliate. It is also viewed as a way of shielding humanitarian workers from harm, and perhaps more importantly, paves the way for $35 million in payments from the US which were previously withheld.
I think the whole thing is a silly bow to political correctness, but consider the following:

Red_diamond_1 Because of the controversy over Magen David Adom (and a number of other disputes), for a number of years the introduction of an additional neutral protection symbol had been under discussion, with the Red Crystal being the most popular choice. Other attempts for additional emblems included Sri Lanka in 1957 and India in 1977 who tried to establish a Red Swastika, and efforts by the national societies of Kazakhstan and Eritrea to use a unique combination of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent, which was similar to the combination of both symbols used by the national society of the USSR until its demise.

It should be noted that the swastika was a symbol of purity, quite benign, in Asia long before it was used by Hitler’s Third Reich. Yet somehow a red swastika on a truck zooming toward me as I am buried under a pile of earthquake rubble doesn’t seem very reassuring.

Read Full Post »